Wuthering heights cathy and heathcliff relationship

Wuthering Heights - What is the nature of Cathy's love for Heathcliff? Showing of 34

wuthering heights cathy and heathcliff relationship

Cathy is trying to analyse the nature of her relationship with Heathcliff, for Nelly's benefit (and ours). But we know she's already chosen to marry. In the novel “Wuthering Heights”, by Emily Bronte, Catherine and Heathcliff's the characters' sense of self and the course of their romantic relationships. Middle-school angst has nothing on the love story of Catherine and Heathcliff in Emily Bronte's famous novel ''Wuthering Heights.'' Heathcliff.

The following year, Edgar becomes very ill and takes a turn for the worse while Nelly and Cathy are out on the moors, where Heathcliff and Linton trick them into entering Wuthering Heights.

Heathcliff keeps them captive to enable the marriage of Cathy and Linton to take place. After five days, Nelly is released, and later, with Linton's help, Cathy escapes.

wuthering heights cathy and heathcliff relationship

She returns to the Grange to see her father shortly before he dies. Soon after she arrives, Linton dies. Hareton tries to be kind to Cathy, but she withdraws from the world. At this point, Nelly's tale catches up to the present day Time passes and, after being ill for a period, Lockwood grows tired of the moors and informs Heathcliff that he will be leaving Thrushcross Grange. Ending chapters 32 to 34 [ edit ] Eight months later, Lockwood returns to the area by chance.

Given that his tenancy at Thrushcross Grange is still valid, he decides to stay there again. He finds Nelly living at Wuthering Heights and enquires what has happened since he left.

She explains that she moved to Wuthering Heights to replace the housekeeper, Zillah, who had left. Heathcliff has an accident and is confined to the farmhouse. During his convalescence, he and Cathy overcome their mutual antipathy and become close. While their friendship develops, Heathcliff begins to act strangely and has visions of Catherine.

He stops eating and, after four days of increasingly bad health, is found dead in Catherine's old room. He is buried next to Catherine. As he gets ready to leave, he passes the graves of Catherine, Edgar, and Heathcliff and pauses to contemplate the quiet of the moors. Characters[ edit ] Heathcliff: Found, presumably orphaned, on the streets of Liverpool and taken by Mr.

Earnshaw to Wuthering Heights, where he is reluctantly cared for by the family. He and Catherine grow close and their love is the central theme of the first volume.

His revenge against the man she chooses to marry and its consequences are the central theme of the second volume. Heathcliff has been considered a Byronic herobut critics have pointed out that he reinvents himself at various points, making his character hard to fit into any single type.

He has an ambiguous position in society, and his lack of status is underlined by the fact that "Heathcliff" is both his given name and his surname. First introduced to the reader after her death, through Lockwood's discovery of her diary and carvings.

The description of her life is confined almost entirely to the first volume. She seems unsure whether she is, or wants to become, more like Heathcliff, or aspires to be more like Edgar.

Some critics have argued that her decision to marry Edgar Linton is allegorically a rejection of nature and a surrender to culture, a choice with unfortunate, fateful consequences for all the other characters.

wuthering heights cathy and heathcliff relationship

Introduced as a child in the Linton family, he resides at Thrushcross Grange. Edgar's style and manners are in sharp contrast to those of Heathcliff, who instantly dislikes him, and of Catherine, who is drawn to him.

Catherine marries him instead of Heathcliff because of his higher social status, with disastrous results to all characters in the story. The main narrator of the novel, Nelly is a servant to three generations of the Earnshaws and two of the Linton family.

Humbly born, she regards herself nevertheless as Hindley's foster-sister they are the same age and her mother is his nurse. She lives and works among the rough inhabitants of Wuthering Heights, but is well-read, and she also experiences the more genteel manners of Thrushcross Grange. She is referred to as Ellen, her given name, to show respect, and as Nelly among those close to her.

Critics have discussed how far her actions as an apparent bystander affect the other characters and how much her narrative can be relied on.

wuthering heights cathy and heathcliff relationship

Isabella is seen only in relation to other characters, although some insight into her thoughts and feelings is provided by the chapter, a long letter to Ellen, detailing her arrival at Wuthering Heights after her marriage to Heathcliff. She views Heathcliff romantically, despite Catherine's warnings, and becomes an unwitting participant in his plot for revenge against Edgar. Heathcliff marries her, but treats her abusively.

While pregnant, she escapes to London and gives birth to a son, Linton. Catherine's elder brother, Hindley, despises Heathcliff immediately and bullies him throughout their childhood before his father sends him away to college. Hindley returns with his wife, Frances, after Mr Earnshaw dies.

He is more mature, but his hatred of Heathcliff remains the same. After Frances's death, Hindley reverts to destructive behaviour and ruins the Earnshaw family by drinking and gambling to excess. Heathcliff beats up Hindley at one point after Hindley fails in his attempt to kill Heathcliff with a pistol.

The son of Hindley and Frances, raised at first by Nelly but soon by Heathcliff. Nelly works to instill a sense of pride in the Earnshaw heritage even though Hareton will not inherit Earnshaw property, because Hindley has mortgaged it to Heathcliff.

Heathcliff, in contrast, teaches him vulgarities, as a way of avenging himself on Hindley. Hareton speaks with an accent similar to Joseph's, and occupies a position similar to a servant at Wuthering Heights, unaware how he has been done out of his inheritance.

In appearance he reminds Heathcliff of his aunt, Catherine. The daughter of Catherine and Edgar, a spirited and strong-willed girl unaware of her parents' history.

Edgar is very protective of her and as a result she is eager to discover what lies beyond the confines of the Grange. Although one of the more sympathetic characters of the novel, she is also somewhat snobbish against Hareton and his lack of education.

The son of Heathcliff and Isabella. A weak child, his early years are spent with his mother in the south of England. He learns of his father's identity and existence only after his mother dies, when he is twelve.

In his selfishness and capacity for cruelty he resembles Heathcliff. Physically he resembles his mother. He marries Cathy Linton because his father, who terrifies him, directs him to do so, and soon after dies from a wasting illness associated with tuberculosis.

A servant at Wuthering Heights for 60 years who is a rigid, self-righteous Christian but lacks any trace of genuine kindness or humanity.

Wuthering Heights - Heathcliff & Cathy - I've Come Home

He speaks a broad Yorkshire dialect and hates nearly everyone in the novel. The first narrator, he rents Thrushcross Grange to escape society, but in the end decides society is preferable. He narrates the book until Chapter 4, when the main narrator, Nelly, picks up the tale. Hindley's ailing wife and mother of Hareton Earnshaw.

She is described as somewhat silly and is obviously from humble family backgrounds.

Mr and Mrs Earnshaw: Catherine's and Hindley's father, Mr Earnshaw is the master of Wuthering Heights at the beginning of Nelly's story and is described as an irascible but loving and kind-hearted man. He favours his adopted son, Heathcliff, which causes trouble in the family. In contrast, his wife mistrusts Heathcliff from their first encounter. Mr and Mrs Linton: Edgar's and Isabella's parents, they educate their children in a well-behaved and sophisticated way.

Mr Linton also serves as the magistrate of Gimmerton, like his son in later years. I'm wearying to escape into that glorious world, and to be always there; not seeing it dimly through tears, and yearning for it through the walls of an aching heart; but really with it, and in it" Ch.

Their love is an attempt to break the boundaries of self and to fuse with another to transcend the inherent separateness of the human condition; fusion with another will by uniting two incomplete individuals create a whole and achieve new sense of identity, a complete and unified identity. This need for fusion motivates Heathcliff's determination to "absorb" Catherine's corpse into his and for them to "dissolve" into each other so thoroughly that Edgar will not be able to distinguish Catherine from him.

Freud explained this urge as an inherent part of love: Love has become a religion in Wuthering Heights, providing a shield against the fear of death and the annihilation of personal identity or consciousness. This use of love would explain the inexorable connection between love and death in the characters' speeches and actions. Wuthering Heights is filled with a religious urgency—unprecedented in British novels—to imagine a faith that might replace the old.

Nobody else's heaven is good enough. Echoing Cathy, Heathdiff says late in the book, "I have nearly attained my heaven; and that of others is altogether unvalued and uncoveted by me!

The hope for salvation becomes a matter of eroticized private enterprise Catherine and Heathcliff have faith in their vocation of being in love with one another They both believe that they have their being in the other, as Christians, Jews, and Moslems believe that they have their being in God. Look at the mystical passion of these two: That passion is a way of overcoming the threat of death and the separateness of existence.

wuthering heights cathy and heathcliff relationship

Their calling is to be the other; and that calling, mad and destructive as it sometimes seems, is religious. The desire for transcendence takes the form of crossing boundaries and rejecting conventions; this is the source of the torment of being imprisoned in a body and in this life, the uncontrolled passion expressed in extreme and violent ways, the usurpation of property, the literal and figurative imprisonments, the necrophilia, the hints of incest and adultery, the ghosts of Catherine and Heathcliff—all, in other words, that has shocked readers from the novel's first publication.

Each has replaced God for the other, and they anticipate being reunited in love after death, just as Christians anticipate being reunited with God after death. Nevertheless, Catherine and Heatcliff are inconsistent in their attitude toward death, which both unites and separates. I only wish us never to be parted," Catherine goes on to say, "I'm wearying to escape into that glorious world," a wish which necessarily involves separation Ch.

Wuthering Heights - Wikipedia

Conventional religion is presented negatively in the novel. The abandoned church at Gimmerton is decaying; the minister stops visiting Wuthering Heights because of Hindley's degeneracy. Catherine and Heathcliff reject Joseph's religion, which is narrow, self-righteous, and punitive.

Is conventional religion replaced by the religion of love, and does the fulfillment of Heathcliff and Catherine's love after death affect the love of Hareton and Cathy in any way?

Does the redemptive power of love, which is obvious in Cathy's civilizing Hareton, relate to love-as-religion experienced by Heathcliff and Catherine?

Is what Catherine and Heathcliff call love and generations of readers have accepted as Ideal Love really an addiction? Stanton Peele argues that romantic or passion love is in itself an addiction.

What exactly does he mean by addiction? An addiction exists when a person's attachment to a sensation, an object, or another person is such as to lessen his appreciation of and ability to deal with other things in his environment, or in himself, so that he has become increasingly dependent on that experience as his only source of gratification.